Hi.  My name is Greg Bossert.  I write Science Fiction, Fantasy, and Horror under my full name, Gregory Norman Bossert, and I have been fortunate enough to have sold a few stories, one of which won the World Fantasy Award.   Here’s more about me.  Then again, maybe you are looking for more information on the fantastic artwork.

I am delighted to announce that my story The Empyrean Light, originally published in Conjunctions #71, will be included in Paula Guran’s Year’s Best Dark Fantasy & Horror from Prime Books, alongside works from some of my favorite authors.

Announcing The Unquiet Dreamer: A Tribute to Harlan Ellison, edited by Preston Grassmann with illustrations by Yoshika Nagata, coming out this August from PS Publishing. I am delighted that my story With Frank and Lucinda Brewer at the East Pole is part of this anthology.
It’s available for preorder now, in both hardcover and a signed limited-edition slipcased version. And the release party will be at WorldCon in Dublin—look for me there!

Here’s a peek at the backstory behind the anthology, and at some of the included artwork and stories.

And here are details on the limited edition.



My story The Empyrean Light from Conjunctions:71 A Cabinet of Curiosity is available to read online.  Or you can buy the full issue in trade paperback book format at selected bookstores or online here.

Something was lying in the street. Ms. Wronski thought she saw it move, but by the time she had juggled her way up the stairs with her keys and the bag with the milk and the crumple of supermarket flyers and her satchel of ungraded homework, she was no longer certain. Curious, she peered down at it through the brittle curtains. Between the steep angle and the dim light of the street lamp, all Ms. Wronski could make out was a featureless black lump of undecided shape or size. As she watched, it moved, slowly up like a hand raised in hesitant recognition, then uncertainly down again. She stepped back from the window with a vague sense of embarrassment, and went to put the kettle on.

“It’s a bag, one of those green trash bags for the leaves,” she said to the teapot.

But this explanation didn’t sit well in Ms. Wronski’s stomach; something about the motion she’d seen was too deliberate to be the wind, more like the pouring of the milk than the way it swirled afterward in her cup. An image came to her, so vivid and visceral that she spilled her tea, of an infant escaped from one of the houses that lined the other side of the street, its little hands and knees bruised and filthy from the asphalt.

Here’s an amazing concept design by artist Leilani Joy for The Scout from my story The Tale of the Scout and the Pachydormu, out now at Beneath Ceaseless Skies.

My novelette The Tale of the Scout and the Pachydormu is out now on the Beneath Ceaseless Skies website, as part of their tenth anniversary issue.  This is my fourth story at BCS, and I am proud to be able to be a part of the celebration of ten years of truly great fantasy.

The Tale of the Scout and the Pachydormu

I am delighted to announce that I’ve sold my novelette “The Tale of the Scout and the Pachydormu” to Beneath Ceaseless Skies. This is my fourth sale to that excellent venue, and I’m every bit as thrilled as I was for the first sale.  Here are my previous stories there:

The Telling — my first published fantasy story and winner of the 2013 World Fantasy Award

The Leaves Upon Her Falling Light

The Wind Shall Blow

And here’s the opening of the story:

Like you, I grew up with the telling of the Tale of the Scout and the Pachydormu. That telling, on the night of first new moon of winter, marked my years between toddler and twelve like tree rings.

The warm spice smell of the Butter Punch, the weight of that punch on your tongue and in your throat, the sugar crunch of the cookies–the slumped star of their legs and heads, the soft meringue of their shell hiding a spoonful of jam or a candied nut or the startling crackof the one uncooked bean that appointed the finder the night’s Governor–the giggles and gasps as the night’s Governor was hefted overhead and passed hand to hand around the room, the soft-hard of flannel blankets quilting the floor, pillowcases still filled with last year’s smells and last year’s crumbs, the knock and groan of the radiators whose warmth grew more welcome as the night stretched out.  And of course the soft solemn tones of ‘Uncle Willow’ reciting the Tale.

I’m delighted to have sold my short story “The Empyrean Light” to Conjunctions, for their Fall 2018 issue “A Cabinet of Curiosity”.

Here’s a taste:

Something was lying in the street. Ms. Wronski thought she saw it move, but by the time she had juggled her way up the stairs with her keys and the bag with the milk and the crumple of supermarket flyers and her satchel of ungraded homework, she was no longer certain. Curious, she peered down at it through the brittle curtains. Between the steep angle and dim light of the streetlamp, all Ms. Wronski could make out was a featureless black lump of undecided shape or size. As she watched, it moved, slowly up like a hand raised in hesitant recognition, then uncertainly down again. She stepped back from the window with a vague sense of embarrassment, and went to put the kettle on.

My story Left Hand Jane out now in Conjunctions: 69 Being Bodies, available from bookstores or online.

My story God-ray is out today on the Saturday Evening Post website:

God-Ray

Teodor Reljić interviews me in the latest issue the Antae Journal on the topic of Utopias, available online now, prompted in part by the recent new edition of More’s Utopia from Verso Books, featuring fantastic essays from China Miéville and Ursula K. Le Guin.

We talk about utopias as process vs. plan, the American tradition of the shiny “world of tomorrow”, the problem of inclusion in Utopia, and whether Jeff VanderMeer’s Area X is a new sort of Utopian vision.

Read more here!

Site © 2010 Gregory Norman Bossert Artwork © 2010 Dermot Power Suffusion theme by Sayontan Sinha